This is my wild life.

Laura Crawford Williams has been a professional wildlife photographer since 2001 after three of her images were published in National Wildlife magazine. She’s traveled extensively through Southern South America running wildlife photography workshops and working with a variety of public and private conservation organizations. She’s an award winning and internationally recognized photographer published in a variety of sources including National Geographic magazine and books.

Mission Statement

To present the natural world as an emissary for its own preservation and enhancement, teach about the natural world through photographic stories, and hopefully, shift egocentric human perspectives toward the environment.

My wild life began...

Laura Crawford Williams was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. She earned her Master’s degree at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Biomedical and Surgical Illustration and has Bachelor’s degrees in Visual Arts and Scientific Illustration. Her career experience outside of photography includes biomedical illustration and 3D animation, as well as educational and entertainment software production. She began doing wildlife photography in 1999 after the company where she had been working was sold. Her first published images appeared in National Wildlife Magazine in 2001. Since then, she has been published in magazines such as National Geographic, Nature’s Best, Smithsonian, and The Nature Conservancy. She has earned national and international recognition for her award winning photography and dedicated herself to further the efforts of those working in wildlife conservation.

In 2007, She and partner German Ambrosetti created Frontera Wildlife Adventures, a wildlife photography tour company operating in Argentina. By 2010, she was able to convert Frontera into a non-profit organization. Together, German and Laura have traveled over 275,000 km in 8 years, exploring and recording the cultural heritage and natural beauty of Southern South America. They provide professional photography and field videography to public and private conservation projects, as well as help with advertising, education, and scientific imagery. Together they hope to further conservation education in Southern South America by sharing its natural beauty with the world.

Laura’s photography has been published in National Wildlife, National Geographic, Nature’s Best, Nature Conservancy, Smithsonian Magazine, Ranger Rick, and Birder’s World magazines – among others.

Education:
Graduate – MA in Medical and Biological Illustration from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
Undergraduate – BFA in Scientific Illustration and Visual Arts from the University of Georgia, Athens, GA

Memberships:
North American Nature Photographer’s Association, American Society of Media Photographers
Conservation Memberships: Nature Conservancy, Land Trust Alliance, Natural Resources Defense Council, National Wildlife Refuge Association, Yellowstone Association, National Wildlife Federation, Sierra Club, and Defenders of Wildlife

ETHICS IN THE FIELD

As nature and wildlife photographers, we become hypocritical when damaging plants and animals while working to tell their stories through photography. Small creatures and plants may go unnoticed, and are even more likely to be disturbed. Gaining knowledge of the subject and its ecosystem, in advance, will help to prevent inadvertent damage and produce better images. The welfare of the subject and its environment must come before all other considerations. A wildlife photographer must also learn and respect laws created to protect plants and animals, seek permission from private landowners for access to privately owned land, and have patience with other photographers and the general public.

ETHICS IN THE OFFICE

As nature and wildlife photographers, we become hypocritical when damaging plants and animals while working to tell their stories through photography. Small creatures and plants may go unnoticed, and are even more likely to be disturbed. Gaining knowledge of the subject and its ecosystem, in advance, will help to prevent inadvertent damage and produce better images. The welfare of the subject and its environment must come before all other considerations. A wildlife photographer must also learn and respect laws created to protect plants and animals, seek permission from private landowners for access to privately owned land, and have patience with other photographers and the general public.

Publications & awards

  • 2013
    Nature’s Best Magazine
    Honorable Mention in
    ‘Birds’ category
  • 2011
    Bee in Nature’s Best
    3rd place out of 20 professional photographers
  • 2010
    Images for Conservation ProTournament 2010
    National Wildlife Magazine
    Honorable Mention in ‘Birds’ category
  • 2009
    NANPA Member Competition
    ‘Top 10’ from 4,120 images, as judged by professional photographers of the North American Nature Photographers Association
    Nature’s Best Windland
    Smith Rice Awards
    Honorable Mention in ‘Birds’, professional division (Exhibited at the Smithsonian Natural History Museum)
  • 2008
    National Wildlife Magazine
    Second place in ‘Birds’,
    professional division
  • 2007
    Nature’s Best Windland
    Smith Rice Awards
    Two ‘Highly Honored’ images in ‘Birds’ (Exhibited at the Smithsonian Natural History Museum)
  • 2006
    Nature’s Best Windland
    Smith Rice Awards
    Winner of ‘Animal Antics’ (Exhibited at the Smithsonian Natural History Museum); ‘Highly Honored’ image in ‘Birds’
    International Wild Bird Photographer
    Winner of the ‘Best Artistic Image’